Review: Thunderstorm Dancing by Katrina Germein and Judy Watson

resized_9781743314593_224_297_FitSquareCROSS-PROMOTION: Three authors are celebrating and and helping to cross-promote each other’s new picture book, all out in April.

Here’s a REVIEW of Katrina Germein’s and Judy Watson’s thundery book, called Thunderstorm Dancing.  See an earlier blog for Susan Whelan’s and Gwynneth Jones’ delightful book, Don’t Think About Elephants.

Both authors will be promoting my new picture book with Ann James: I’m a hungry dinosaur.

#outinApril
Check them out!


If ever there was a perfect title, this is it!

This is a picture book which takes us gently, cautiously at first, away from the quietness of the beach to the noise and boisterousness of a wild, cacophonous thunderstorm!

Soon, everyone in the family becomes part of the joyous frenzy of a thunderstorm dance – all, except the little girl. She’s the bystander to the action. Only when all is quiet does she shine, with her striped beach towel aloft, as a rainbow!

Katrina’s use of rhyme, rhythm and sensory imagery is a delight as are Judy’s evocative, energetic illustrations, which make the pages bounce with mood, movement and atmosphere.

I had the pleasure of launching this great book and encouraged the audience of Year 1 Students from St Teresa’s, Brighton. SA, to help celebrate the launch with their own thunderstorm dance!

Which they did. Great fun.

Thunderstorm Dancing is available from:
http://www.allenandunwin.com/default.aspx?page=94&book=9781743314593 or from any good booksellers. RRP: $24.99

Review of Don’t Think About Purple Elephants

CROSS-PROMOTION: Three authors are celebrating and and helping to cross-promote each other’s new picture book, all out in April.

Here’s a REVIEW of Susan Whelan’s and Gwynneth Jones’ delightful book, Don’t Think About Elephants.

Katrina Germein’s and Judy Watson’s thundery book, called Thunderstorm Dancing will have a REVIEW blog here on Wednesday 10th. Both authors will be promoting my new picture book with Ann James: I’m a hungry dinosaur. #outinApril

Check them out!


dont-think-about-purple-elephants1-300x287We all have worries, but when Sophie is alone in bed at night, all her worries pop into her head and she doesn’t know what to do about them.

Poor Sophie struggles from lack of sleep and still the worries persist, despite all the good, helpful intentions from her caring family.

That is until Mum comes up with a rather an unusual idea! ‘DON’T think about purple elephants,’ she says.

Well, try as she might, not to think of purple elephants, all sorts of funny, friendly purple elephants start to fill Sophie’s nighttime thoughts. Soon there simply isn’t any room left for her worries!

So, Sophie’s happy, and since she’s sleeping better, she’s much brighter and bouncier next day. All thanks to those purple elephants that she wasn’t going to think about!

This is truly a delightful book that explodes with colour and energy and carries a wonderful, subtle message for anxious kids.

Written with fun and sensitivity by Susan Whelan, a writer, editor and Managing Editor of the highly-regarded children’s literature website, Kids’ Book Review, Don’t Think About Purple Elephants is boldly and brightly illustrated by Gwynneth Jones, who is also studying to be an art therapist.

Don’t Think About Purple Elephants is published by EK Books; http://www.ekbooks.com.au, and available from http://www.purpleelephants.com.au and wherever good books are sold. RRP $24.95

Celebrating Children’s Book Day

Let’s celebrate Children’s Book Day by finding out which books you read as a child. I was asked to name mine and here they are. What were yours?

I know I loved curling up with any Enid Blyton stories and there was a girl nurse series called Cherry Ames.  I also loved reading about brave people like The Small Woman by Pearl Buck (a true life David and Goliath story set in China) and daring people like Houdini. I know too I was given a copy of Little Women for one birthday which I read but not sure I really liked it at the time.

Because we had so few books in the home and I never went to a library, or had library books at school, the book choice was very limited, and a book for Christmas or birthday was very  much looked forward to. I would read dad’s adult Reader’s Digest books and at the age of 7 tried to read Charles Dickens’ Ye Old Curiosity Shop, which shows how much I wanted to read!

readers digestBecause I topped the class in year 7, my parents bought me a large Junior Reader’s Digest Omnibus which contained stories, articles, and poems and I devoured and treasured that book. Unfortunately in one of my many moves later in life, it was lost and it broke my heart. Luckily, some years later I came across another copy in an op-shop. I was thrilled and now have it back to look over the stories I read and re-read.

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